As our federal government attempts to strip insurance coverage form millions of Americans, this issue is very real in the Bay Area. Recently released data from a partnership between RWJF and the CDC have given us a new view into this critical issue. They make all their survey data at census tract level which is precise enough for us to map out the bay area cities and see where people live without insurance in large numbers.

The  data are only provided for certain cities large enough to meet their requirements, but there are many cities in our region included, and the trends across them may surprise you.

You can grab this map here.

Get the complete data files for the country or just your city here.

How Good Are These Data?

What we appreciate about the 500 Cities Project is its small-area estimation methodology which makes data available for individual cities and neighborhoods throughout the country and allows for comparisons between and within cities.  These data are not direct measurements from surveys but rely on a rather clever method that connects survey data from health agencies with more generic demographic data from the Census. We are often frustrated with health data being only available at county level so this is great detail for us to analyze.

What Else Is Included?

The survey data includes many variables on preventative practices, behaviors and health outcomes. Individual city reports are available here.

Variables included are:

Health Outcomes

All teeth lost among adults aged >=65 Years
Arthritis among adults aged >=18 Years
Cancer (excluding skin cancer) among adults aged >=18 Years
Chronic kidney disease among adults aged >=18 Years
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among adults aged >=18 Years
Coronary heart disease among adults aged >=18 Years
Current asthma among adults aged >=18 Years
Diagnosed diabetes among adults aged >=18 Years
High blood pressure among adults aged >=18 Years
High cholesterol among adults aged >=18 Years who have been screened in the past 5 Years
Mental health not good for >=14 days among adults aged >=18 Years
Physical health not good for >=14 days among adults aged >=18 Years
Stroke among adults aged >=18 Years

Prevention

Cholesterol screening among adults aged >=18 Years
Current lack of health insurance among adults aged 18–64 Years
Fecal occult blood test, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy among adults aged 50–75 Years
Mammography use among women aged 50–74 Years
Older adult men aged >=65 Years who are up to date on a core set of clinical preventive services: Flu shot past Year, PPV shot ever, Colorectal cancer screening
Older adult women aged >=65 Years who are up to date on a core set of clinical preventive services: Flu shot past Year, PPV shot ever, Colorectal cancer screening, and Mammogram past 2 Years
Papanicolaou smear use among adult women aged 21–65 Years
Taking medicine for high blood pressure control among adults aged >=18 Years with high blood pressure
Visits to dentist or dental clinic among adults aged >=18 Years
Visits to doctor for routine checkup within the past Year among adults aged >=18 Years

Unhealthy Behaviors

Binge drinking among adults aged >=18 Years
Current smoking among adults aged >=18 Years
No leisure-time physical activity among adults aged >=18 Years
Obesity among adults aged >=18 Years
Sleeping less than 7 hours among adults aged >=18 Years
By | 2017-05-18T10:53:31+00:00 May 11th, 2017|GIS & Mapping, Profiles, Public Health|0 Comments

About the Author:

Spike has research experience in community development, housing, criminology, spatial epidemiology and reentry issues. He speaks nationally about data driven decision making and was chosen as one of Next American City’s Vanguard class of 2012 and honored as a White House Champion of Change in 2013. He’s a dad, husband and co-author for the new book on open public data: Beyond Transparency.

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